Skip to content
I would like to receive email updates from Oxfam Canada. I understand I can unsubscribe at any time.
Ending global poverty begins with women’s rights

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Theory of Change

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Theory of Change

by Oxfam Canada | May 6, 2020

This resource, Sexual & Reproductive Health & Rights Theory of Change: Increasing Bodily Autonomy, Agency and Enjoyment of SRHR, outlines Oxfam Canada’s Theory of Change for its sexual and reproductive health and rights programming. A theory of change shows how we expect outcomes to occur over the short, medium and longer-term as a result of our work. In this document, we outline how we understand sexual and reproductive health and rights, why we focus on this area, the ultimate aim of our sexual and reproductive health and rights programming, our Theory of Change for our work in this area and highlights and best practices stemming from our sexual and reproductive health and rights programs.

At their most basic level, sexual and reproductive health and rights involve peoples’ ability to exercise meaningful decision-making power over their health, bodies and lives, as well as the wider social systems and enabling environment necessary for them to do so. Ensuring that all people have full autonomy and agency over their lives and bodies is necessary for improved health and education outcomes, as well as their freedom to participate in all aspects of economic life. In this sense, realizing sexual and reproductive health and rights is fundamental to achieving gender justice, sustainable development and fulfilling women and young people’s human rights and well-being. Yet sexual and reproductive health and rights are some of the most challenging rights to achieve, particularly for adolescent girls and young women. This is largely because barriers to
realizing sexual and reproductive health and rights are rooted in unequal gender power relations, stigma and entrenched social norms, with ripple effects at individual, household, community and policy levels.

Author
Oxfam Canada

Share This