BRAND TRACKER

Fight for the human rights of the women who make our clothes. Make a living wage fashionable.

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Paying the women who make our clothes enough money to live on is the right thing to do, and brands can afford it.

The What She Makes campaign is tracking action taken towards a living wage, starting with five of Canada’s biggest and best-known fashion brands. We want to create a race to the top by celebrating leadership taken by companies and highlighting gaps. We need your voice to make the most impact. Take action and let brands know you expect more from them.

 

The Brand Tracker ranks companies on their progress toward a living wage. We have published our colour-coded ranking within the tag graphics below, as well as a blog with more info on how we arrived at each ranking. We have outlined how we will measure progress so you know how we're going about this process.

 

We've reached out to these companies and asked them to make a commitment to pay the women who make our clothes a living wage. We need you to add your voice and show brands that people care about #WhatSheMakes. Click on the Demand Action buttons below to send them a message on social media.

 

We gave these brands a deadline of November 1, 2021 to make a commitment prior to the release of our brand tracker rankings on November 23, 2021. The brand tracker below will continue to be updated with the results of our conversations with them as new commitments are made.

HOW WE MEASURE PROGRESS

As a first step, we want brands to make a public commitment to pay a living wage within their supply chain within 4 years, and publish it on their website. Oxfam is willing to help brands on each step of their journey to achieving that commitment because we care about #WhatSheMakes.

Where do your clothes come from? Good luck finding out! Most brands do not publicly disclose where their clothes are made, and if they do, it’s vague at best.

We think brands should be transparent and disclose their full supply chain and publish the following information on their website: full name of authorized production units and processing facilities, site addresses, parent companies, types of products made and number of workers.

This should include regular reporting to ensure all their factories uphold human rights.

Within 12 months of making a commitment to a living wage in their supply chain, we want brands to publish their plans on how they will make it happen.

Within 4 years of making a commitment, brands should be paying a living wage within their supply chains. This requires collaboration, consultation and public reports on their progress throughout the process.

HOW WE TRACK

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Action Taken

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Some Action
Taken

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No Action
Taken

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Not Applicable
Yet

Read our Brand Tracker Backgrounder to learn more about the “Making a Commitment” milestone.

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Making a Commitment

Being Transparent

Publishing Plans

Paying a Living Wage

Aritzia engages suppliers on economic security for workers but has not made a commitment nor set a timeframe to pay a living wage. Aritzia’s supplier Code of Conduct requires meeting local legal requirements or industry standards for wages and benefits, but not a living wage.

Read more about where Aritzia stands.

Making a Commitment

Being Transparent

Publishing Plans

Paying a Living Wage

Herschel reports having a Code of Conduct for their suppliers that follows international standards but does not make it publicly available on its website. As such, any wage provisions or other commitments are not verifiable.

Read more about where Herschel stands.

Making a Commitment

Being Transparent

Publishing Plans

Paying a Living Wage

Joe Fresh’s supplier Code of Conduct requires payment of wages and benefits according to locally applicable laws and regulations. Although they encourage suppliers to commit to betterment of wages and benefits, there is no clear commitment or verifiable timeframe to achieve living wages.

Read more about where Joe Fresh stands.

Making a Commitment

Being Transparent

Publishing Plans

Paying a Living Wage

So close! lululemon’s 2020 Impact Report notes that their recently updated vendor Code of Ethics expects their suppliers to move towards paying fair compensation, based on Fair Labor Association (FLA) and Global Living Wage Coalition (GLWC) definitions. This is an amazing commitment, but they still need a clear timeline and milestones.

Read more about where lululemon stands.

Making a Commitment

Being Transparent

Publishing Plans

Paying a Living Wage

Roots’ investor disclosures state that suppliers and manufacturers are subject to a code of conduct. However, the code of conduct is not publicly available on its website. As such, any wage provisions or other commitments are not verifiable.

Read more about where Roots stands.

Oxfam Canada does not endorse nor have any affiliation with the companies that are featured in this campaign. Oxfam Canada acknowledges that the copyright in the logos featured is the property of these companies. 
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