Arms Trade Treaty

Sign the Arms Trade Treaty, Photo Credit : Andrew Kelly/Oxfam

Every day, millions of people suffer from the consequences of armed violence. This violence is fuelled by unregulated global trade in arms and ammunition—enabling weapons to fall into the hands of dictators, criminals, drug traffickers and terrorists.

Every day, millions of people suffer from the consequences of armed violence. This violence is fuelled by unregulated global trade in arms and ammunition—enabling weapons to fall into the hands of dictators, criminals, drug traffickers and terrorists.

In June 2013, more than 60 states signed the groundbreaking Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). While Canada voted for the treaty in April 2013, it chose not to sign the treaty at the United Nations in June.

Since 2013, the Canadian Control Arms Coalition, of which Oxfam is part, has been recommending that Canada sign the Arms Trade Treaty without hesitation. In April 2017, a bill was introduced in the House of Commons that Canada would join the international Arms Trade Treaty. Under the global agreement, which now involves 130 countries, the federal government will be required to implement brokering controls on arms sales.

 

Control Arms

The unregulated arms trade has contributed, among other things, to considerable loss of life, widespread human rights abuse and gender-based violence, political instability, preventable conflicts, and corruption. In turn, all of these factors have undermined peace and peace-building processes, human security, poverty reduction initiatives, and prospects for sustainable socio-economic development.

What Canada Needs to Do

By signing the ATT, Canada would join these countries in creating a safer world for the thousands of civilians living under the threat of violence.

 


 

 

Documents released prior to June 2013: