Growing a better future

“OXFAM AND THIS VEGETABLE GARDEN HAVE CHANGED MY LIFE” – Patouma.
“Oxfam and this vegetable garden have changed my life.” – Patouma. Photo Credit: Eldson Chagara / Oxfam.

As temperatures rise, extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and more severe. Farmers are struggling to cope. Women like Patouma are often the hardest hit, as they are left to tend small farms and families, and have fewer alternative livelihoods when crops are lost. But we can help change this reality.

What does hunger have to do with climate change? A lot. Wild weather and unpredictable seasons are changing what farmers can grow. Food prices are going up. Food quality is going down. Soon, climate change will affect what all of us can eat. In Malawi, its impacts are already lethal.  

As temperatures rise, extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and more severe. Farmers are struggling to cope. And nearly a billion of the world’s poorest people – people who did the least to cause climate change – are finding it even harder to feed their families. Women like Patouma are often the hardest hit, as they are left to tend small farms and families, and have fewer alternative livelihoods when crops are lost.

"In a good year, when the rains are good, I can sometimes harvest up to 15 bags of maize. Last year, I planted my crops as usual but due to the drastic change of climate and very little rain, I only managed to harvest one bag.
That only lasted one month. My family and I had never before been as hungry as we were then."
– Patouma

We passionately believe in our approach to combat poverty, and to build equality and sustainability in the developing world.  We’ve seen it work with our own eyes. But we neep help.

Will you consider making a donation today? Your gift will be put to work in countries like Malawi, funding sustainable solutions to extreme poverty and inequality.

For a woman like Patouma, your gift can help us:

  • Distribute seeds and fertilizers to families like Patouma’s to help them grow sustainable crops;
  • Install solar power pumps to help farmers irrigate their crops – getting the maximum benefit out of every drop of water;
  • Re-design fields so farmers can trap what little moisture exists in the soil;
  • Build women’s leadership to help women and girls enjoy lives free from violence so they can be active leaders in their society.           

We know that when we can teach farmers to build their resilience, they are able to withstand droughts far better. We must act right now to prevent extreme hunger and disease. And we must stay after the immediate crisis is over, to help farmers recover their livelihoods and rebuild for the future. Are you with us?