General

Photo: Tom Pietrasik. Mymensingh, Bangladesh. November 19th 2014

It’s time to start conversations, get involved and pressure our lawmakers for much-needed changes.

Emily Kirby (left) and other Oxfam Ambassadors on tour with Coldplay in Toronto.

Emily Kirby recounts her experience as an Oxfam Ambassador for the Stand As One campaign – a global movement of Coldplay fans standing in solidarity with refugees and displaced people.

This year for Mother's Day, think globally, and give your mom a gift that crosses boundaries and makes a lasting impact on the lives of people around our planet. Visit OxfamUnwrapped.ca for all the details.

Photo of Melody Mutsauki with her two year old daughter Brighton outside their home in Zimbabwe.

Transforming gender and power relations is critical to ending poverty and challenging inequality. Read examples of how Oxfam and our partners are strengthening the laws that protect the rights of women and girls.

Oxfam Canada. Photo: Anne Toralles Leite

Oxfam is committed to walk that path, determined to rebuild the trust of our supporters, our partners and the people we work with, never losing sight of our mission to end global poverty by supporting women’s rights.

Oxfam

Executive Director Julie Delahanty answers donor and supporter questions about Oxfam's work.

Photo of women in Bangladesh. Credit: Goutham Jho

The #MeToo campaign is empowering survivors across the globe to share their stories.  But in many countries, women and girls still can’t speak out or access justice. 

Laila in Bangladesh

Laila, who is pregnant with two young children, describes the treacherous journey from Myanmar to Bangladesh.

Coldplay

Oxfam is currently on tour with Coldplay to raise awareness to the plight of refugees. Oxfam is asking Coldplay fans to stand together with people forced to flee conflict and disaster. 

Mary Kwamboka runs a small roadside kiosk in one of Nairobi’s many informal settlements. As a single mother, the small amount of money she makes helps put food on the table for her three children. Credit: Allan Gichigi/Oxfam

How can we build an economy that works for everyone? Fenella Porter explains why in order to conceptualize a truly ‘human’ economy we need to look at inequalities of gender as much as inequalities of wealth.

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